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Title and Meta descriptions are used by all Bloggers.

Why?

Because of SEO (Search Engine Optimization).

Title and Meta descriptions are needed to better understand what is the content will be read.

Google wants to give the best experience. So if you don’t optimize SEO you will never grow on Google.

Ok now you will say that SEO is too difficult, there is no keyword research.

First SEO is required if you want to grow on Google and other search engines.

So in this article, we gonna help you better understand what are Title and Meta description and how you can optimize it for SEO.

Some external websites — especially social networks — will use your title tag to determine what to display when you share that page.

Here’s a screenshot from Facebook, for example:

Keep in mind that some social networks (including Facebook and Twitter) have their own meta tags, allowing you to specify titles that differ from your main title tag.

This can allow you to optimize for each network, and provide longer titles when/where they might be beneficial.

What is a meta title tag?

A title tag is an HTML element that specifies the title of a web page. Title tags are displayed on search engine results pages (SERPs) as the clickable headline for a given result, and are important for usability, SEO, and social sharing.

The title tag of a web page is meant to be an accurate and concise description of a page’s content.

Enter your title below to see how it would appear in Google’s search results.

Title tag Coding example

<head>
  <title>Example Title</title>
</head>

Optimal format

Here is the optimal format:

Primary Keyword – Secondary Keyword | Brand Name

Or

8-foot Green Widgets – Widgets &amp; Tools | Widget World

For example:

Gaming PC 2019 under $800 – Wikicat

Title Optimal length

Google typically displays the first 50–60 characters of a title tag. If you keep your titles under 60 characters, our research suggests that you can expect about 90% of your titles to display properly.

There’s no exact character limit, because characters can vary in width and Google’s display titles max out (currently) at 600 pixels.

Why are title tags important?

Meta title tags are a major factor in helping search engines understand what your page is about, and they are the first impression many people have of your page.

Title tags are used in three key places: (1) search engine results pages (SERPs), (2) web browsers, and (3) social networks.

1. Search engine result pages

Your title tag determines (with a few exceptions) your display title in SERPs, and is a search visitor’s first experience of your site.

Even if your site ranks well, a good title can be the make-or-break factor in determining whether or not someone clicks on your link.

2. Web browsers

Your title tag is also displayed at the top of your web browser and acts as a placeholder, especially for people who have many browser tabs open.

Unique and easily recognizable titles with important keywords near the front help ensure that people don’t lose track of your content.

3. Social networks

How do I write a good title tag?

Because title tags are such an important part of both search engine optimization and the search user experience, writing them effectively is a terrific low-effort, high-impact SEO task.

Here are critical recommendations for optimizing title tags for search engine and usability goals:

1. Watch your title length

If your title is too long, search engines may cut it off by adding an ellipsis (“…”) and could end up omitting important words. While we generally recommend keeping your titles under 60 characters long, the exact limit is a bit more complicated and is based on a 600-pixel container.

Some characters naturally take up more space. A character like uppercase “W” is wider than a lowercase character like “i” or “t”. Take a look at the examples below:

The first title displays a full 77 characters because the “ittl” in “Littlest” is very narrow, and the title contains pipes (“|”).

The second title cuts off after only 42 characters because of wide capital letters (like “W”) and the fact that the next word in the title tag is the full website name.

Try to avoid ALL CAPS titles.

They may be hard for search visitors to read, and may severely limit the number of characters Google will display.

Keep in mind that, even within a reasonable length limit, search engines may choose to display a different title than what you provide in your title tag.

For example, Google might append your brand to the display title, like this one:

Here, because Google cut off the text before adding the brand (the text before “…” is the original text), only 35 characters of the original title were displayed.

See more below about how to prevent search engines from rewriting your title tags.

Keep in mind that longer titles may work better for social sharing in some cases, and some titles are just naturally long.

It’s good to be mindful of how your titles appear in search results, but there are no penalties for using a long title.

Use your judgment, and think like a search visitor.

2. Don't overdo SEO keywords

While there is no penalty built into Google’s algorithm for long titles, you can run into trouble if you start stuffing your title full of keywords in a way that creates a bad user experience, such as:

Buy Widgets, Best Widgets, Cheap Widgets, Widgets for Sale

Avoid titles that are just a list of keywords or repeat variations of the same keyword over and over.

These titles are bad for search users and could get you into trouble with search engines.

Search engines understand variations of keywords, and it’s unnecessary and counterproductive to stuff every version of your keyword into a title.

3. Give every page a unique title

Unique titles help search engines understand that your content is unique and valuable, and also drive higher click-through rates.

On the scale of hundreds or thousands of pages, it may seem impossible to craft a unique title for every page, but modern CMS and code-based templates should allow you to at least create data-driven, unique titles for almost every important page of your site.

For example, if you have thousands of product pages with a database of product names and categories, you could use that data to easily generate titles like:

[Product Name] – [Product Category] | [Brand Name]

Absolutely avoid default titles, like “Home” or “New Page” — these titles may cause Google to think that you have duplicate content across your site (or even across other sites on the web).

In addition, these titles almost always reduce click-through rates. Ask yourself: how likely are you to click on a page called “Untitled” or “Product Page”?

4. Put important keywords first

Keywords closer to the beginning of your title tag may have more impact on search rankings.

In addition, user experience research shows that people may scan as few as the first two words of a headline.

This is why we recommend titles where the most unique aspect of the page (e.g. the product name) appears first.

Avoid titles like:

Brand Name | Major Product Category – Minor Product Category – Name of Product

Titles like this example front-load repetitive information and provide very little unique value at first glance.

In addition, if search engines cut off a title like this, the most unique portion is the most likely to disappear.

5. Take advantage of your brand

If you have a strong, well-known brand, then adding it to your titles may help boost click-through rates.

We generally still recommend putting your brand at the end of the title, but there are cases (such as your home page or about page) where you may want to be more brand-focused.

As mentioned earlier, Google may also append your brand automatically to your display titles, so be mindful of how your search results are currently displayed.

6. Write for your customers

While title tags are very important to SEO, remember that your first job is to attract clicks from well-targeted visitors who are likely to find your content valuable. It’s vital to think about the entire user experience when you’re creating your title tags, in addition to optimization and keyword usage.

The title tag is a new visitor’s first interaction with your brand when they find it in a search result — it should convey the most positive and accurate message possible.

Why won't Google use my title tag?

Sometimes, Google may display a title that doesn’t match your title tag. This can be frustrating, but there’s no easy way to force them to use the title you’ve defined.

When this happens, there are four likely explanations…

1. Your title is keyword-stuffed

As discussed above, if you try to stuff your title with keywords (sometimes called “over-optimization”), Google may choose to simply rewrite it.

For many reasons, consider rewriting your title to be more useful to search users.

2. Your title doesn't match the query

If your page is matching for a search query that isn’t well represented in the title, Google may choose to rewrite your display title.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing — no title is going to match every imaginable search — but if your title is being overruled for desirable, high-volume searches, then consider rewriting it to better match those search keywords and their intent.

3. You have an alternate title

In some cases, if you include alternate title data, such as meta tags for Facebook or Twitter, Google may choose to use those titles instead.

Again, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but if this creates an undesirable display title, you might want to rewrite the alternate title data.

What is a meta description tag?

According to Moz: The meta description is an HTML attribute that provides a brief summary of a web page.

Search engines such as Google often display the meta description—typically up to 160 characters long—in search results where they can highly influence user click-through rates.

Example:

Meta description Coding example

<head>
<meta name="description" content="This is an example of a meta description. This will often show up in search results.">
</head>

Meta description Optimal length

Meta descriptions can be any length, but Google generally truncates snippets to ~155–160 characters.

It’s best to keep meta descriptions long enough that they’re sufficiently descriptive, so we recommend descriptions between 50–160 characters.

Keep in mind that the “optimal” length will vary depending on the situation, and your primary goal should be to provide value and drive clicks.

Title and Meta description example

Here is an example of a Title and Meta description.

Optimal format and Google SERP

Meta description tags, while not tied to search engine rankings, are extremely important in gaining user click-through from SERPs.

These short paragraphs are a webmaster’s opportunity to “advertise” content to searchers, and searchers’ chance to decide whether the content is relevant and contains the information they’re seeking from their search query.

A page’s meta description should intelligently (read: in a natural, active, non-spammy way) employ the keywords that page is targeting, but also create a compelling description that a searcher will want to click.

It should be directly relevant to the page it describes, and unique from the descriptions for other pages.

Google ranking factor?

Google announced in September of 2009 that neither meta descriptions nor meta keywords factor into Google’s ranking algorithms for web search.

Here is in short what Google said:

Recently we received some questions about how Google uses (or more accurately, doesn’t use) the “keywords” meta tag in ranking web search results. Suppose you have two website owners, Alice and Bob.

Alice runs a company called AliceCo and Bob runs BobCo. One day while looking at Bob’s site, Alice notices that Bob has copied some of the words that she uses in her “keywords” meta tag.

Even more interesting, Bob has added the words “AliceCo” to his “keywords” meta tag.

Should Alice be concerned?

At least for Google’s web search results currently (September 2009), the answer is no.

Google doesn’t use the “keywords” meta tag in our web search ranking.

What about CTR?

Meta descriptions can however impact a page’s CTR (click-through-rate) on Google which can positively impact a page’s ability to rank. 

For that reason, among others, it’s important to put some effort into meta descriptions.

What about keywords?

Does Google ever use the "keywords" meta tag in its web search ranking?

In a word, no. Google does sell a Google Search Appliance, and that product has the ability to match meta tags, which could include the keywords meta tag.

But that’s an enterprise search appliance that is completely separate from our main web search.

Our web search (the well-known search at Google.com that hundreds of millions of people use each day) disregards keyword metatags completely.

They simply don’t have any effect in our search ranking at present.

Why doesn't Google use the keywords meta tag?

About a decade ago, search engines judged pages only on the content of web pages, not any so-called “off-page” factors such as the links pointing to a web page.

In those days, keyword meta tags quickly became an area where someone could stuff often-irrelevant keywords without typical visitors ever seeing those keywords.

Because the keywords meta tag was so often abused, many years ago Google began disregarding the keywords meta tag.

Does this mean that Google ignores all meta tags?

No, Google does support several other meta tags.

This meta tags page documents more info on several meta tags that we do use.

For example, we do sometimes use the “description” meta tag as the text for our search results snippets.

Even though we sometimes use the description meta tag for the snippets we show, we still don’t use the description meta tag in our ranking.

Does this mean that Google will always ignore the keywords meta tag?

It’s possible that Google could use this information in the future, but it’s unlikely.

Google has ignored the keywords meta tag for years and currently we see no need to change that policy.

SEO best practices

Try to write compelling ad copy

The meta description tag serves the function of advertising copy.

It draws readers to a website from the SERP, and thus is a very visible and important part of search marketing.

Crafting a readable, compelling description using important keywords can improve the click-through rate for a given webpage.

To maximize click-through rates on search engine result pages, it’s important to note that Google and other search engines bold keywords in the description when they match search queries.

This bold text can draw the eyes of searchers, so you should match your descriptions to search terms as closely as possible.

Get rid of duplicated meta description tags

As with title tags, it’s important that meta descriptions on each page be unique.

Otherwise, you’ll end up with SERP results that look like this:

One way to combat duplicate meta descriptions is to implement a dynamic and programmatic way to create unique meta descriptions for automated pages.

If possible, though, there’s no substitute for an original description that you write for each page.

Absolutely don't include double quotation marks

Any time quotation marks are used in the HTML of a meta description, Google cuts off that description at the quotation mark when it appears on a SERP.

To prevent this from happening, your best bet is to remove all non-alphanumeric characters from meta descriptions.

If quotation marks are important in your meta description, you can use the HTML entity rather than double quotes to prevent truncation.

Sometimes it's okay to not write meta descriptions

Although conventional logic would hold that it’s universally wiser to write a good meta description rather than let the engines scrape a given web page, this isn’t always the case.

Use this general rule of thumb to identify whether you should write your own meta description:

If a page is targeting between one and three heavily searched terms or phrases, write your own meta description that targets those users performing search queries including those terms.

If the page is targeting long-tail traffic (three or more keywords), it can sometimes be wiser to let the engines populate a meta description themselves.

The reason is simple: When search engines pull together a meta description, they always display the keywords and surrounding phrases that the user has searched for.

If a webmaster writes a meta description into the page’s code, what they choose to write can actually detract from the relevance the engines make naturally, depending on the query.

One caveat to intentionally omitting meta description tags: Keep in mind that social sharing sites like Facebook commonly use a page’s meta description tag as the description that appears when the page is shared on their sites.

Without the meta description tag, social sharing sites may just use the first text they can find.

Depending on the first text on your page, this might not create a good user experience for people encountering your content via social sharing.

Heads up: Search engines won't always use your meta description

In some cases, search engines may overrule the meta description a webmaster has specified in the HTML of a page.

Precisely when this will happen is unpredictable, but it often occurs when Google doesn’t think the existing meta description adequately answers a user’s query and identifies a snippet from the target page that better matches a searcher’s query.

Conclusion

That’s all we know for now :3

Remember that we constantly update this post like the others.

Hope this post helped you someway.

Thanks for reading.

Remember to share this post with your preferred social network and tell your followers how you find it.

Need help? comment below this post and we will contact you soon if possible.

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Categories: SEO

Jonathan Terreo

Jonathan is a Software/Web Developer that loves blogging in the free time. He loves to upload quality content to his websites. He is a WordPress/SEO expert due to his experience.

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